Amazon Opens Its First Non-Food Store in the UK

The first non-food Amazon store will hit the High Street in the UK and sell around 2,000 products that people love the most and have highly rated reviews. 

The store will be called Amazon 4-star due to the fact that almost every product that they will sell has a 4-star rating or higher. 

Still, retail experts stated that the opening of this kind of store could be confusing and dull. 

The US already has more than 30 Amazon 4-star stores, and the UK store will be the first one to exist outside of the country. 

The line of products will include books, electronics, games, toys and home decor products, which customers from Amazon enjoy spending their money on. Actually, 49% of the UK Prime members shopped in the technology department.

Additionally, a section in the store called “Most Wished For” will show products that customers have put on their wish lists. 

The stores’ prices will be the ones that are online, and customers don’t need an Amazon account to use them. 

Customers at the Amazon 4-star store will have the ability to collect items that they’ve ordered online as well as return the products they didn’t like.

The UK Amazon 4-star store director refused to spread the rumours about how many stores like this one will be opened in the future.

ABOUT AUTHOR

As a writer for Don’t Disappoint Me, my job is to collect relevant key information and interpret it into a wide range of content. I also have an MSc in Marketing, so I am always trying to expand my knowledge and discover new and exciting areas of digital marketing, SEO and web traffic building. I am a nature enthusiast, so when I’m not researching and analyzing, I love to go hiking with my dogs, camping, or snowboarding. I am a bookaholic as well and have an ongoing obsession with crime TV shows and movies.

Latest from Ljubica

Amazon Opens Its First Non-Food Store in the UK Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp Experiencing a Global Blackout Instagram lets users add pronouns to their profile Apple accused of breaking UK competition law by overcharging for its apps

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *